This will be dust

Reminders of impermanence...

Lucky people generate good fortune via four basic principles. They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities, make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition, create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations, and adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good.

Findings from research psychologist Richard Wiseman, author of The Luck Factor, who also asked a sample pool of volunteers to spend a month applying these four principles and found that 80% emerged “happier, more satisfied with their lives and, perhaps most important of all, luckier.”

Pair with how to make your own luck.

(via explore-blog)

fastcompany:

Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.
Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.
Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

fastcompany:

Last month, I talked to Amazon customer service about my malfunctioning Kindle, and it was great. Thirty seconds after putting in a service request on Amazon’s website, my phone rang, and the woman on the other end—let’s call her Barbara—greeted me by name and said, “I understand that you have a problem with your Kindle.” We resolved my problem in under two minutes, we got to skip the part where I carefully spell out my last name and address, and she didn’t try to upsell me on anything. After nearly a decade of ordering stuff from Amazon, I never loved the company as much as I did at that moment.

Remember, this was a customer-service call, so I was fully prepared for it to suck. Like most American consumers, my experience with service interactions is largely negative, whether it’s on the phone, in the murky depths of a commerce site, or in the aisles of an electronics store. I’m accustomed to the company being in control, and for our communication to be cold, scripted, and inhumane. Barbara’s congenial but no-nonsense approach was part of what made this experience different, but more important, she had access to exactly the right data about me, and that made the favorable exchange possible. The fact is, Amazon has been collecting my information for years—not just addresses and payment information but the identity of everything I’ve ever bought or even looked at. And while dozens of other companies do that, too, Amazon’s doing something remarkable with theirs. They’re using that data to build our relationship.

Read more about How Companies Like Amazon Use Big Data To Make You Love Them

When you fall in love, make sure it’s with somebody who treats you exactly how you deserve to be treated. Love somebody who wants to know everything about you, from your favourite colour to your childhood memories to how you managed to survive all those years. Love somebody who can make you laugh. Love somebody who kisses your forehead. Love somebody who notices all of your flaws but chooses to see past them. Love somebody who tucks you into two duvets when you’re cold. Love somebody who listens to whatever is on your mind. Love somebody who always reminds you how lucky they are to have found you. Love somebody who let’s you choose the channel, decorate the cake, have the umbrella, and order the wine. Love somebody who shows you off in public. Love somebody who gets on well with your family. Love somebody who strokes your thumb when you hold hands. Love somebody who knows how you take your coffee, what toppings to pick off your pizza, and which parts of movies are your favourite. Love somebody who brushes the hair out of your face to see your eyes. Love somebody who you can’t wait to wake up to every morning. Love somebody who will sit through an episode of your favourite TV show even though they have no idea what’s going on. Love somebody who protects you. Love somebody who you can’t stay mad at for more than an hour because you miss speaking to them. Love somebody who waits for you to get on the train. Love somebody who knows all the words to your favourite song because they’ve listened to you sing it a thousand times. Love somebody who knows every freckle on your face, every stretch mark on your thighs, every scar and every tear. Love somebody who you can plan a future with. Love somebody who helps you forget what it feel like to be sad. And most importantly, love somebody who makes you question why you were so afraid to fall in love in the first place.

—(via deliriosity)

(Source: the-taintedtruth, via cptsdandme)